Disability

Disability

disability

Disability

A disability may generally be defined as a condition which may restrict a person’s mental, sensory or mobility functions.

According to the Disability Discrimination Act of Australia (DDA) their disability or challenge can be in one or more of the following areas:

  • Physical – affects a person’s mobility or dexterity
  • Intellectual – affects a person’s ability to learn
  • Mental – affects a person’s thinking processes
  • Sensory – affects a person’s ability to hear or see
  • Neurological – results in the loss of some bodily or mental functions

Why focus on disability?

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Why focus on disability?

People with disabilities are often marginalised by society and are affected by discrimination from education through to work opportunities. They are often excluded or offered services or support that is not of an equal nature. This leads to high rates of unemployment of around 80% in South Africa and in the rest of the developing world. It also leads to social exclusion.

These people have a right to be included in all aspects of society, in order that schools, workplaces and society generally are truly reflective of the diversity of people. This clearly benefits them but also makes society “richer” and more meaningful through an appreciation of the other – a fundamental building block of Ubuntu.

At Evolve we believe we can help non-profits and corporates achieve their goals and have a positive and meaningful impact on society. We achieve this by fully understanding the situation that pertains and looking for creative ways to enhance the inclusive profile of our clients, whilst never compromising on quality and productivity.

Social enterprise and disability

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Social enterprise and disability

The integration of business principles into a social purpose organisation has the advantage of sustainability in a dynamic culture.

It allows these organisations to be less dependent on traditional funding and more independent.  They can combine the best practice of social impact and business. This pathway in the field of disability is innovative and also creates a “real world” environment that affords people with disabilities the opportunity to journey towards full inclusion in society through their experiences and the building of personal relationships.

Successful social enterprises with a focus on disability often concentrate on appropriate training and support towards the goal of an inclusive workforce. This requires the development of innovative business models – an extensive experience area of Evolve and its team.

Benefits

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Benefits

The benefits of inclusion of people with disabilities through transformation of existing organisations, as well as new innovative social enterprises, are significant. They include:

  • A more motivated workforce
  • Direct social impact on excluded members of society and their families
  • Economic improvement
  • Reduced dependants on social grants
  • Achievement of BEE targets
  • Enhanced and improved relationships with all stakeholders – employees, shareholders and customers

Our 7 step replication process

Our 7 step replication process

Social Innovation

What is social innovation?

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What is social innovation?

Social innovation is new solution to a social problem. Those solutions could take the form of new products, new services, new models or new processes, but the focus is on creating a more effective, efficient, sustainable or just solution to a challenge that society is facing. Such solutions are capable of not just being good for society, but also developing new relationships and collaborations that would not have happened otherwise.

Why innovate?

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Why innovate?

  • to address a social problem that has not been effectively addressed up until this point
  • to ensure the sustainability of an organisation through new solutions
  • to scale social impact
  • to create new partnerships
  • to spread the benefits of social innovation and entrepreneurship

How does it work?

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How does it work?

Social innovations come from individuals, groups or organisations and can take place in the for-profit, nonprofit, social enterprise or public sectors. Increasingly they are happening in collaboration with each other.

There is no one process for making social innovation happen and this is its strength. A unique combination of environmental conditions, social issues and the individuals involved, create an environment for innovation.

Whether you have a problem that needs an innovative solution or an idea for a social innovation, Evolve can work with you to develop your idea, pilot a solution and roll out an innovation.

Evolve Circles are a peer-to-peer mentorship concept that practitioners use to engage with other organisations on the path of social innovation.

Social Innovation Models

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The main models of social innovation

Although the out-working of each social innovation model will look different, they do all share similar characteristics.

SOCIAL IMPACT
Any social innovation must have a social issue to address, and as such when successful it must create social impact.
INNOVATION
In order to be classed as a social innovation, there must be some level of innovation in the product or service, the business model, the processes or the systems. A working business model, just transposed into a different geographical location may work well to resolve a social problem, but would not be considered an innovation.
SUSTAINABILITY
Any social innovation aims to be efficient, effective and sustainable. If a model seems efficient and effective but is unsustainable then it cannot be implemented. It may be that innovative finance models or resource provision would need to be developed to bring the innovation to the point of implementation.
COLLABORATION
Social innovations are being developing across different sectors. Partners in the innovation can come from any sector, and successful innovations often talk about the diversity of the their teams that enabled the innovation to happen – whether it is private companies and government working together, or people from different disciplines.

Benefits

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The benefits of social innovation

SOCIAL CHANGE
As social innovations are focused on addressing a social problems, the successful implementation of those innovations results in positive social change.

SUSTAINABLE MODELS
At their core social innovations, in order to work, must be sustainable. With models of sustainability built into the innovation the impact they have can continue for as long as it is needed.

IMPROVED COLLABORATION
Working across sectors and disciplines creates new relationships and linkages that can create
opportunities for further innovation in the future.

Social Replication

What is social replication?

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What is social replication?

This business process works exclusively with social enterprises or organizations which are created and designed to address social problems and are financially sustainable. The aim of replicating these successful businesses, is to expand the organization’s impact by scaling up the service. Evolve takes into account the social goal, organisational capacity and the dimensions of the need to create a tailored replication model.

Why replicate?

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Why replicate?

  • to enhance impact and the application of innovative social solutions
  • to diversify or increase income
  • to allow scale while remaining committed to values and purpose
  • to encourage partnerships
  • to spread the benefits of the social enterprise movement

How does it work?

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How does it work?

Social replication uses a similar operational model to commercial franchising or other similar reproduction structures, but with inherent social objectives.

Social replication is the systematisation and arrangement of knowledge and values held within the organisation, so that the key aspects of the business model are made visible and evident – and therefore reproducible by a third party.

Evolve also collects key findings from work with clients and has established a shared knowledge base that is accessible by its clients and partners.

Evolve Circles are a peer-to-peer mentorship concept that practitioners use to engage with other organisations on the path of social replication.

Models

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The main models of social replication

There are several replication options available to social purpose organisations. Each organisation is assessed individually and then depending on their unique factors, an appropriate model is selected. The main models are:

SOCIAL FRANCHISING
This is much like commercial franchising (i.e. contractually replicating a successful business model), but with clearly defined social/environmental benefits
SOCIAL LICENSING
This refers to more flexible contractual agreements that can be used to increase a social purpose organisation’s activities
PARTNERSHIPS/COLLABORATION
This model focuses on working with organisations that are working towards a similar social goal via incorporating the replication of the social solution in-a-box.
OPEN SOURCE
This model is the free sharing of a social purpose model, often via a digital / online format. It is spread via innovative marketing mechanisms and includes a clear “how-to” and a pledge to decrease misuse.

Benefits

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The benefits of social replication

COST EFFECTIVENESS
This results in a proportionate saving in costs gained by an increased level of production / service deliveries.

PROFESSIONALISATION
Often by partnering with other organisations as franchisees one can tap into their experiences in their respective sectors enabling the organisation to improve the quality of their services or products.

IMPROVED DATA COLLECTION
In a study conducted by ICSF 80% of respondents who had replicated, measured outcomes data, as compared to only 62% of those who had not considered replication.

GREATER AWARENESS
Able to gain a much fuller understanding of social problems affecting the country, improving the organisation’s ability to influence policy.

INNOVATION
One’s offering is often improved through learning across the network, thereby increasing social impact.

INCOME OPTIMISATION
Companies gain national contracts for their services after having reached a certain scale and can therefore offer their franchisees more income opportunities.

Mentoring

What is Mentoring?

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What is Mentoring?

In Greek mythology, Mentor was the older and wiser friend to whom Ulysses entrusted the care of his kingdom when he went off to save Troy. Troy’s infant son, Telemachus, had Mentor alongside of him for more than 20 years as a teacher and wise counsel.

Mentoring programmes take this concept of an older, wiser, and more experienced supporter and formalise it. Many organisations are recognising the benefit of mentoring for their staff, and such programmes are also being used to further the diversity agenda.

Diversity mentoring has mainly focused on issues around gender and ethnicity to date – disability mentoring, our particular interest here at Evolve, is a new field that we are excited to be part of.

Why Mentoring?

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Why Mentoring?

  • enables organisations to increase their social impact through mentoring programmes
  • enables the individuals they work with to achieve their potential
  • creates an opportunity for mentors to ‘pay it forward’ in terms of support they have received
  • creates a mentoring culture in organisations and train the mentors of the future

How does it work?

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How does it work?

All mentoring programmes have a chosen focus. Some focus on getting individuals into employment, others on career development and others on social issues or supporting people with a specific challenge.

Mentoring programmes match a mentor with a mentee. Mentors are typically individuals who have more experience in a particular area or an issue, than the mentees with whom they are matched with.

Mentoring programmes can either run for a specific length of time, or they can be ongoing. They can arrange face-to-face meetings for mentors and mentees and/or they can take place online.

The main models of Mentoring

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The main models of Mentoring

There are a number of different models of mentoring programmes and within each model there are numerous variations depending on the specific environment and needs of the individuals participating in the programme.

SUPPORT ORGANISATION PROGRAMME
This model is a programme run by a support organisation for the benefit of their members. They place their beneficiaries with a mentor who will be able to support the mentee in the next stage of their development. The programme are focused on specific areas such as supporting mentees into employment or how to deal with issues relating to a particular disability.
PEER-TO-PEER
These models are often found in learning environments where a new student is mentored by another student one or two years ahead of them in the programme. Alternatively, they might be community focused programmes linking mothers together or entrepreneurs with each other.

EMPLOYER
This is a mentorship programme based in a particular company. Employees are matched with more experienced employees in the same company.

The benefits of Mentoring

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The benefits of Mentoring

KNOWLEDGE SHARING
Knowledge and experience are shared between mentors and mentees. The mentor and mentor are able bring a new understanding of issues they face to each other.

OPENING UP NEW NETWORKS
The mentor is able to give the mentee access to their own networks they have developed, which otherwise might have not been accessible to the mentee.

CONFIDENCE BUILDING
Mentoring builds the confidence of the mentee in the area the mentoring is focused on. It also teaches mentors new transferable skills that can be used in leading and managing people.

‘PAY IT FORWARD’
Many mentors have had the support of an older, wiser mentor at different points in their life. Becoming a mentor themselves is a great way to give back to the next generation.

DIVERSITY ISSUES
Mentoring programmes give organisations the opportunity to put their diversity policies and procedures into practice by giving people the opportunity to be mentored that would not have had access to such support previously.

Clients & Collaborating Partners

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